Women Writers Reading Challenge: #68-75 The End

  At first I was going to post the rest of the reading challenge one book at a time, like I did for all the rest of the books, but then I decided that would take weeks to get them all out there, and meanwhile I wouldn't be able to start posting this year's books. … Continue reading Women Writers Reading Challenge: #68-75 The End

Top Ten Tuesday: 10 Books I Wouldn’t Mind Finding Under My Tree

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly feature  brought to you by the Broke and the Bookish. I think my mom was heartbroken when I asked her if Santa was real in the second grade. She loved the magic of it. She told me that while Santa and fairies might not be real, the magic of … Continue reading Top Ten Tuesday: 10 Books I Wouldn’t Mind Finding Under My Tree

Women Writers Reading Challenge #65: The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot

You may have noticed this book popped up on my favorites list for Top Ten Tuesday. There were actually a number of books on that list that I haven't done a post about yet, but they will all be coming I promise. This book came out about five years ago, but it's lost none of … Continue reading Women Writers Reading Challenge #65: The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot

Women Writers Reading Challenge #54: Constance: The Tragic and Scandalous Life of Mrs. Oscar Wilde by Franny Moyle

I was really eager to read the story of a woman whose accomplishments and failures were totally overshadowed by those of her husband. While that was not necessarily unusual for women of the period, it seems a bit strange that we should do so for Constance Wilde if only because of the scrutiny her husband … Continue reading Women Writers Reading Challenge #54: Constance: The Tragic and Scandalous Life of Mrs. Oscar Wilde by Franny Moyle

Women Writers Reading Challenge #51: The Secret History of Wonder Woman by Jill Lepore

So the early Wonder Woman? Yeah, she was kind of a badass. And she is descended from some of the most influential suffragettes and women's rights leaders of the early twentieth century, owing debts to Margaret Sanger and Emmeline Pankhurst. Her creator also invented the lie detector (though the patented invention--the polygraph--would be created by … Continue reading Women Writers Reading Challenge #51: The Secret History of Wonder Woman by Jill Lepore

Women Writers Reading Challenge #48: A Scented Palace by Elisabeth de Feydeau

The full title of this work on non-fiction is A Scented Palace: The Secret History of Marie Antoinette's Perfumer, which really helps to explain the whole premise of the biography. Jean-Louis Fargeon was a man with Republican leanings and an aristocratic clientele, and his story gives insight into how the country was split by the French Revolution. … Continue reading Women Writers Reading Challenge #48: A Scented Palace by Elisabeth de Feydeau

Women Writers Reading Challenge #45: Joan of Arc by Helen Castor

I do not advise trying to read this book early in the morning before you're fully awake because if you're anything like me (i.e. you don't speak French) the sheer amount of French names/places in this book will make your head spin. However, once you're fully awake, if you're interested in the history of this … Continue reading Women Writers Reading Challenge #45: Joan of Arc by Helen Castor

Women Writers Reading Challenge #38: Princesses Behaving Badly by Linda Rodriguez McRobbie

I listened to this book on a road trip with my grandparents. Nana and Papa came to visit us in Boise and then I drove back with them to spend more time with family and a girlfriend who flew in from out of town. The book was everything you could want from a trip read--it … Continue reading Women Writers Reading Challenge #38: Princesses Behaving Badly by Linda Rodriguez McRobbie

Women Writers Reading Challenge #31: The Battle of Versailles: The Night American Fashion Stumbled into the Spotlight and Made History by Robin Givhan

There is just something about fashion, and the culture of the 70s, and battles between the French and the Americans that I just find endlessly fascinating. I have to admit that as far as political history goes, anything that happened after the 1960s feels much to recent and much too boring. But socially and culturally, … Continue reading Women Writers Reading Challenge #31: The Battle of Versailles: The Night American Fashion Stumbled into the Spotlight and Made History by Robin Givhan